Third Estate French Revolution Essays

Third Estate Grievances Essay

Third Estate

The Grievances of the Third Estate was the list of ideas that the cahier of the Third Estate sent to the Estates General on how the new Constitution should be drafted. It included the injustices on how the Third Estate was currently being treated, as well as ideas to restore their social standing and rights. The document begins by stating the people's loyalty to the King and then lists the Third Estate's wishes. Then they go on to tell him about each of the grievances of each of the groups of the Third Estate.

The first section calls for the peasants or working people of the Third Estate to be of equal status to all other citizens of any class. This included a unification of the three estates, with each contributing equally in all parts of the State. This meant the people of the Third Estate would no longer allow themselves to be treated unfairly.

The rest of the document is specifically divided into various areas of existing injustices the Third Estate were anguishing under. The final section of complaints was based on the citizens' rights to own property. The Bourgeoisie were rarely arrested or jailed, but the people wanted to be able to hunt game on their property at any time they chose as well as be allowed to remove any weeds or debris from their own land. Finally, the Third Estate wanted the militia to be formed voluntarily, so that those citizens who did not want to leave their jobs or families behind would not have to do so. They...

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French Revolution Essay

2491 words - 10 pages France was a nation ruled by an absolute monarch who had power beyond the grasp of any peasant, and just out of the reach of the aristocracy. King Louis XIV (1774 - 1791) of France was not willing to give up his monopoly that had existed for seventeen years. It was the perfect situation for his absolute government, and may have remained that way if he had been able to manage France’s finances successfully. More money had been spent on roads'...

The French Revolution. Essay

922 words - 4 pages What caused the French Revolution? Many things contributed to it evolving. But only three were the most important. The influence dates back all the way to the Age of Enlightenment, the ideas definitely had an effect on the French citizens. The American Revolution ties with the Enlightenment as well. The political inequality of the three estates played...

Causes and Reactions of The French Revolution.

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Causes of french Revolution

793 words - 3 pages The event most commonly associated with the beginning of the French Revolution is the storming of the Bastille on July 14, 1789. Instigated by rumors that the King had begun to organize military forces for a counterattack against government reformers, a crowd of urban Parisians converged upon the Bastille with the intent of staging a preemptive strike against the monarchy. A state prison and military armory, the Bastille had been seen by the...

To what extent was Louis XVI to blame for the problems in France?

779 words - 3 pages One of the several obstacles that caused problems for Louis XVI and that wasn't in any way his own fault was his wife. He was married to one of Maria Theresa's daughters, Marie Antoinette, who came from a very wealthy family so she was very spoiled and wanted to live a life full of luxury (such as always buying herself unnecessary things), and this...

French Revolution By: Tan Ly

1945 words - 8 pages What impact did the American Revolution have on Europe? The American Revolution, had a great impact on the Europeans. The citizens of Europe could daily read about the happenings of the American Revolution in newspapers, books, and magazines. The revolution embedded a hope for change into the minds of Europeans....

To What Extent Does Napoleon Represent The Forces

1252 words - 5 pages Napoleon, to a large extent represented the forces behind the French Revolution. In order that this essay is answered accurately the forces behind the French Revolution must be reckoned with first. It is essential therefore to understand that these forces could be categorized into four three main pillars of contention; political,...

This is a paper on the conditions during the reign of Louis lV, during the cultural renaissance in europe.

1248 words - 5 pages Describe Absolutism. Describe how absolutism expressed itself in painting, architecture, sculpture, and politics.Absolutism:Absolutism is a political assertion or theory that claims that all power is vested in either a Monarch or a small group of people. This type of ruler often feels that his or her authority is given to them by a divine decree. During the era of absolutist style of welding power, France and other places around...

Causes of the French Revolution

1927 words - 8 pages Causes of the French Revolution The French Revolution happened in France around the period 1789-92 (although these dates are disputed by historians), and resulted in the overthrow of the French monarchy and the Ancien Régime (the system of government). The monarchy in France had been established for many centuries, and the causes of the Revolution were deeply-rooted, including the problems with the Ancien Régime, the growth of nationalism,...

French Revolution Timeline

2254 words - 9 pages 1775Louise XVI takes the French throne after the Louise XV unexpectedly dies of smallpox.1776The American war of independence has begun against Great Britain. The rivalry between the France and England, forces France to financially support the American Revolution. This drains the French treasury, and thus paving the way for the French revolution.1778France declares war against Britain in support of the American...

French Revolution

1840 words - 7 pages This essay will be a summary of Chapter three, on the French Revolution. It will, in retrospect, describe the roller coaster years of a nation in peace and upheaval; in prosperity and poverty; in humility and humiliation. This essay also focuses on several groups and individuals who helped mould and destroy a great nation all in the name of greed and selfish desire. Absolutism, on the surface, appeared to be "THE" best system of government....

The French Revolution Essay

2068 Words9 Pages

In the latter years of the eighteenth century, France was an aristocratic bureaucracy, presided over by sovereign monarch Louis XVI. France was ruled under the Ancien Régime; a social and political system established by the French in the early renaissance period of the fifteenth century, until the late eighteenth century where it was violently overturned in the French Revolution. ‘ Under the Ancien Régime the richer a man was, the less he paid.’1 The French Revolution, beginning in 1789 was an era of social and political upheaval that saw the collapse of the absolute monarchy and its prejudice class system. Before the French Revolution of 1789, France was subject to a social division dictated by ones circumstance of birth and wealth. The…show more content…

The prominent disparity between these three estates lead to social discontent that would cause the swift and vehement French Revolution.

The first estate, also known as the Clergy, experienced select entitlements, ‘...besides its honorific preeminence, the Clergy possessed very great privileges.’2 The Clergy were exempt from certain conventions of law and were not subjected to direct taxes, instead they were to give free donations to the king, donations determined on the clergies own authority. This system meant that those of the first estate were rarely obliged to any form of taxation, especially taxation of free will. The Clergy were ‘closely allied with the monarchy, whose divine right was symbolized by the religious ceremony of coronation, the clergy exercised a control over thought in the interests of both Church and king, possessed a monopoly in education and shared in the censorship of everything that was lawfully printed.’3 Contributing to the Clergies power and affluence was the collection of tithes on its property; bishops often acted as lords over a village, and as a result, they were to receive payment from those they imposed taxes on. These were often the poorest peasants who worked the land of the Clergy.

The Nobility, or the second estate, lived the most favorable existence of those in post-renaissance France. The Nobility did not possess as many exemptions and privileges as the Clergy, but were often the most wealthy, ‘What really characterized

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